I Loved Pitchapalooza!

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That’s me! I’m pitching Chapter One-A Novel in public for the first time.

I reached a milestone yesterday, and that was pitching Chapter One-A Novel in person for the very first time. Booktowne, a wonderful, independent bookstore in Manasquan, sponsored Pitchapalooza. The panel featured The Book Doctors Arielle Eckstut and David Henry Sterry and local author Patricia Perry Donovan, a previous Pitchapalooza winner.

Pitchapalooza is like an American Idol for writers. In order to qualify, authors had to purchase The Essential Guide to Getting Your Book Published by Eckstut and Sterry from Booktowne. All of the eligible author names were put into a basket. When an author’s name was randomly pulled, he/she had a minute to pitch their book. And yes, authors are cut off at the minute mark whether they are finished or not. Arielle, David, and Patricia would then critique the pitch, noting strengths while suggesting ways the author could improve. At the end of the evening, one author was selected as the winner, who would be introduced to an agent or publisher who is appropriate for his/her book.

I worked hard on my pitch for Chapter One-A Novel...it’s quite difficult to sum up over 90,000 words in about 150, which is roughly a minute. When I picked up my copy of The Essential Guide to Getting Your Book Published, I immediately read the section on “Perfecting Your Pitch.” On the day of Pitchapalooza, I got my pitch down to 58.5 seconds and practiced it several times.

When my name was called, I didn’t run or freak out at all. I confidently read my pitch for Chapter One-A Novel, which was over before I knew it. Patricia, Arielle, and David gave me excellent suggestions to improve my pitch, and I left feeling inspired and reassured about my writing.

It was very interesting to see the range of topics and genres that fellow authors proudly pitched to the panel, which included memoir, young adult, fantasy, children’s books, teaching memoir, and fictional novels like my Chapter One.

The winner was Gerry Gribbon. His pitch for a book that focuses on communication skills for graduates was outstanding. As an educator, I can say with first-hand knowledge that Gribbon’s book is much needed. Congratulations, Gerry! Your pitch set the bar and gave me an excellent example to strive for with my future pitches.

img_5333I am excited that both Arielle and David will be at the Rutgers Writing Conference in June. I am looking forward to revising my pitch and to hopefully having another chance to pitch Chapter One-A Novel to them at the conference. My goal is to memorize my pitch so I can flawlessly recite it without looking at it for the next go-around.

Thank you to Booktowne, the Book Doctors Arielle Eckstut and David Henry Sterry, and to Patricia Perry Donovan for their valuable advice and for taking the time to encourage, inspire, and support new writers.

PS: Fellow author Mandi Bean attended Pitchapalooza with me, and she did a damn fine job pitching her latest novel Moody Blue! It’s not every day that a former student can STILL inspire her teacher, 12 years later and counting….

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Jersey Shore Magazine Spring 2018 Issue is online!

img_4755I’ve been a writer and editor for Jersey Shore Publications for four years and counting, and I absolutely love the gig. I wrote two Beachcomber articles in the Spring 2018 issue of Jersey Shore Magazine, which recently went live online.

My article in the Spring 2018 titled “A Solidarity Shaped by Surfing” tells the story of a Luthringer Longboard that hangs in the atrium of the One Ocean Boulevard condominium complex in Seaside Heights. I absolutely adored this assignment, and I think the article demonstrates my best work to date. I love surfing and surf culture, and finally having the opportunity to write about it was incredibly fulfilling.

A clam-digger since birth, the Jersey Shore culture and lifestyle runs through my veins and inhabits my soul, everything from salt water and surfing, to sea shells and boardwalks. Before 2014, I always loved picking up Jersey Shore Magazine, and as I’d page through the issue, I’d privately wish for the opportunity to be a writer for the publication. That wish came true when one of my oldest and dearest friends put in a good word for me with my now-boss who heads Jersey Shore Publications, and my first piece about the history of a building in downtown Point Pleasant Beach was published in the 2014 Spring issue.

Since then, I’ve been a regular contributor of Beachcomber articles, feature articles, and editorial content including calendar of events and local seasonal guides, to name a few. I’m forever indebted to my boss, George, for both the opportunity to write about topics close to my heart and for his professional feedback.

Jersey Shore Magazine can be found at retailers all along the Jersey Shore, as well as online.